Non-Presidential Elections

National Data

From 2008 (presidential election year) to 2010 (non-presidential election year), the number of Latino registered voters was on the decline with 626,000, while the number of Latino votes cast decreased by 3.1 million. As election trends demonstrate higher numbers of registered voters and turnout during presidential election years, Latino voter registration and turnout increased. However, the period between 2012 to 2014 saw a decrease in registration and voting numbers. Latino voter registration decreased by 835,000, while voter turnout numbers decreased by 4,413,000. 3334

The 2012 elections brought victories for the Democrats– President Barack Obama was reelected for a second term, eight seats were gained in the House of Representatives, and one seat was gained in the Senate. Yet, the 2014 midterm elections challenged the Democrat stronghold over the United States Congress. Five Democrat seats previously held by Republicans during the 2010 election were recaptured by the Republican party in 2014. Additionally, seven seats occupied by Democrats in 2010 and 2012 went to the Republicans in 2014, while the Democrats gained two seats in 2014 that were previously held by Republicans in 2010 and 2012. 3940

As stated in the 2010 Almanac of Latino Politics, voter discontent can swing both ways. Voters often express their discontent with the newly elected president by casting votes in support of the opposing party; this is precisely what happened during the 2014 elections. Democrats lost eight seats in the Senate and twelve seats in the House, which allowed the Republicans to gain control over Congress. However, the midterm elections were not a complete sweep for the Republican party. House Republicans from California, Florida, and Georgia lost three seats to their Democrats counterparts. 41

Districts that elect congressional representatives with less than 50% of the vote are important to watch because they suggest political vulnerability in future elections. During the 2014 midterm elections, only five congressional districts were won with less than 50% of the vote—three of these seats were Republican wins, while the other two went to the Democrats. 42

In 2014, twenty-seven Republican and fourteen Democrat incumbents decided not to seek re-election. After the midterm elections commenced, only one Republican seat went to the Democrats, while five Democrat seats went to the Republicans.

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LATINO VOTES CAST 2014

From 2008 (presidential election year) to 2010 (non-presidential election year), the number of Latino registered voters was on the decline with 626,000, while the number of Latino votes cast decreased by 3.1 million. As election trends demonstrate higher numbers of registered voters and turnout during presidential election years, Latino voter registration and turnout increased. However, the period between 2012 to 2014 saw a decrease in registration and voting numbers. Latino voter registration decreased by 835,000, while voter turnout numbers decreased by 4,413,000. 1314

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ELECTION RESULTS 2014

The 2012 elections brought victories for the Democrats– President Barack Obama was reelected for a second term, eight seats were gained in the House of Representatives, and one seat was gained in the Senate. Yet, the 2014 midterm elections challenged the Democrat stronghold over the United States Congress. Five Democrat seats previously held by Republicans during the 2010 election were recaptured by the Republican party in 2014. Additionally, seven seats occupied by Democrats in 2010 and 2012 went to the Republicans in 2014, while the Democrats gained two seats in 2014 that were previously held by Republicans in 2010 and 2012. 1516

As stated in the 2010 Almanac of Latino Politics, voter discontent can swing both ways. Voters often express their discontent with the newly elected president by casting votes in support of the opposing party; this is precisely what happened during the 2014 elections. Democrats lost eight seats in the Senate and twelve seats in the House, which allowed the Republicans to gain control over Congress. However, the midterm elections were not a complete sweep for the Republican party. House Republicans from California, Florida, and Georgia lost three seats to their Democrats counterparts. 17

Districts that elect congressional representatives with less than 50% of the vote are important to watch because they suggest political vulnerability in future elections. During the 2014 midterm elections, only five congressional districts were won with less than 50% of the vote—three of these seats were Republican wins, while the other two went to the Democrats. 18

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INCUMBENTS NOT SEEKING REELECTION

In 2014, twenty-seven Republican and fourteen Democrat incumbents decided not to seek re-election. After the midterm elections commenced, only one Republican seat went to the Democrats, while five Democrat seats went to the Republicans.

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