The Latino Vote

National Data

Traditionally, voter turnout has reflected an upward-downward trend—upward during presidential election years and downward during non-presidential election years. Particularly among the Latino population, this trend has been steady and consistent between 1972 and 2014.

Latino voter registration patterns have been less predictable. Between 1980 and 2004, voter registration numbers increased, with the exception being 1990, when numbers were down by 131,000. 2006 marked the beginning of an upward-downward pattern similar to the one reflected in voter turnout numbers. 3839

Invariably, the number of Latino registered voters who turn out to vote is greater in each state than the citizen voting age population that is actually registered to vote. This means that Latino registered vote are very likely to turn out on Election Day.

More than three-quarters of Latino registered voters are concentrated in major electoral vote states: California, Texas, Florida, New York, Arizona, New Jersey, Illinois, Colorado, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Nevada. In total, these eleven states have a combined total of 10.7 million Latino registered voters. 41

Twenty states saw growth in both total citizen voting age populations and total registered voters, including Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon. Of the twenty states, Arizona and Colorado experienced over 60% registration growth. Only two states, Arkansas and Kentucky, saw a decrease in their respective total citizen populations while their total registered voters increased. 45

Twelve states had an increase in the Total Citizen Voting Age Population and a decrease in Total Registered Voters, including California, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, and Washington. Of these twelve, only two had over 60% of the population registered to vote (Florida and Michigan). Additionally, Virginia was a state that had over 60% of the population registered in 2012, but less than 50% in 2014. 46

In 2012, the number of states with total registration rate of 60%+ was twelve. By 2014, this number had decreased to seven. Of these seven states, only four of them had 60%+ registration rates (Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, and New Mexico). 47

Of the Latinos who voted in the U.S. during the 2014 elections, the dominant groups were male, ages 45-64, native born, some college or associate’s degree, and of Mexican descent. 49

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VOTER REGISTRATION & TURNOUT

Traditionally, voter turnout has reflected an upward-downward trend—upward during presidential election years and downward during non-presidential election years. Particularly among the Latino population, this trend has been steady and consistent between 1972 and 2014.

Latino voter registration patterns have been less predictable. Between 1980 and 2004, voter registration numbers increased, with the exception being 1990, when numbers were down by 131,000. 2006 marked the beginning of an upward-downward pattern similar to the one reflected in voter turnout numbers. 1516

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LATINO CITIZENS OF VOTING AGE

Invariably, the number of Latino registered voters who turn out to vote is greater in each state than the citizen voting age population that is actually registered to vote. This means that Latino registered vote are very likely to turn out on Election Day.

More than three-quarters of Latino registered voters are concentrated in major electoral vote states: California, Texas, Florida, New York, Arizona, New Jersey, Illinois, Colorado, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Nevada. In total, these eleven states have a combined total of 10.7 million Latino registered voters. 17

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LATINO CITIZENS OF VOTING AGE BY STATE

Twenty states saw growth in both total citizen voting age populations and total registered voters, including Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon. Of the twenty states, Arizona and Colorado experienced over 60% registration growth. Only two states, Arkansas and Kentucky, saw a decrease in their respective total citizen populations while their total registered voters increased. 18

Twelve states had an increase in the Total Citizen Voting Age Population and a decrease in Total Registered Voters, including California, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, and Washington. Of these twelve, only two had over 60% of the population registered to vote (Florida and Michigan). Additionally, Virginia was a state that had over 60% of the population registered in 2012, but less than 50% in 2014. 19

In 2012, the number of states with total registration rate of 60%+ was twelve. By 2014, this number had decreased to seven. Of these seven states, only four of them had 60%+ registration rates (Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, and New Mexico). 20

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LATINO VOTERS IN 2014

Of the Latinos who voted in the U.S. during the 2014 elections, the dominant groups were male, ages 45-64, native born, some college or associate’s degree, and of Mexican descent. 21

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TABLES & GRAPHS
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