Florida

The Sunshine State
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State Highlights
  • Total Latino Population

    4,788,869

  • Median Age of Latinos

    34.8

  • Median Income of Latinos 16+

    $40,903

  • # of Latino Registered Voters

    1,493,000

  • Latinos Without Health Insurance

    25.7%

  • Latino Homeownership

    49.9%

  • Latinos as % of All Under 18

    29.4%

Untitled-1

From 2000 to 2014, the Latino population in Florida increased by 75.6% and accounted for 53.6% of the state’s total population growth. 1

In 2014, Florida’s Latino population totaled 4,788,869 and constituted 24.1% of the state’s total population. 2

Much of the Latino population is concentrated in Miami, Tampa, and Jacksonville. 3 The two counties with the largest Latino populations were Miami-Dade and Broward. 4

In 2014, Florida’s Latino citizen voting age population numbered 2,480,000. 5

Furthermore, Latino registered voters totaled 1,493,000 and constituted 17.2% of all registered voters in the state. 6

Approximately 59.7% of Latino registered voters cast ballots during the November 2014 elections. 7

2014

FL H851 ensured that certain students, including unauthorized immigrants, would have their out-of-state fees waived. To qualify, the students must have attended secondary school for at least three years before graduating. In addition, they must also submit a copy of their official high school transcript as proof of attendance and graduation. 8

In Florida, legislators also passed FL H755, which stipulates when the Florida Board of Bar Examiners can admit an individual who is an unauthorized immigrant, arrived as a minor child, and has lived in the U.S. for 10+ years. 9

Florida was one of twenty-six states that filed a lawsuit against the federal government, arguing that President Obama’s suspension of immigration laws was unconstitutional. 10

76.4% of Latinos were citizens of the United States (52.7% were native born and 23.7% were naturalized). 11

47.3% of Latinos were foreign born. 12

82.5% of Latinos 5-years of age and older spoke Spanish. 13

Of Latino Spanish-speakers 5-years of age and older, 55.0% spoke English “very well”, 18.0% spoke English “well”, 16.5% spoke English “not well”, and 10.6% spoke English “not at all.” 14

The median age of Latinos was 34.8 years compared to 45.0 years for Whites. 15

24.9% of Latinos were under 18 years of age compared to 18.1% of Whites. 16

Latinos comprise 29.4% of all persons under the age of 18. 17

Of Latinos 25-years of age and older, 22.1% had less than a high school diploma (compared to 11.2% of Whites), 29.1% had a high school diploma, GED, or alternative credential (compared to 29.5% of Whites), 27.2% had some college or an Associate’s degree (compared to 30.5% of Whites), 14.7% had a Bachelor’s degree (compared to 18.4% of Whites), and 6.9% had a Graduate degree (compared to 10.4% of Whites)/ 18

Median household incomes totaled $40,903 for Latinos and $50,336 for Whites (in 2014 inflation-adjusted dollars). 19

25.7% of Latinos lacked health insurance compared to 12.1% of Whites. 20

49.9% of Latino households were owner occupied (compared to 68.3% of White households) and 50.1% were renter occupied (compared to 31.7% of White households). 21

7.9% of Latinos were unemployed compared to 6.7% of Whites. 22

The number of Latino-owned businesses grew 127.9% over a 10-year period, going from 266,688 in 2002 to 607,884 in 2012. 23 24

In 2012, receipts for Latino-owned businesses totaled $95.7 million, representing an increase of 31.3% from 2007. 25 26

In 2012, Latino-owned businesses employed 369,280 people with an annual payroll of $12.4 million. 27

In 2015, the Latino purchasing power in Florida totaled $133.9 billion. 28

From 2000 to 2014, Florida’s immigrant population increased 48.8%, growing from 2,670,828 in 2000 to 3,973,515 in 2014 (immigrant share of 20.0% in 2014). 29

In 2014, 37.0% of immigrants living in Florida entered the U.S. before 1990, 22.1% entered between 1990 and 1999, 27.7% entered between 2000 and 2009, and 13.2% entered after 2010. 30

According to a U.S. Census Bureau 2014 estimate, 75.1% of immigrants living in Florida were born in Latin America, 10.6% were born in Asia, 9.8% were born in Europe, 1.6% were born in Africa, and 2.9% were born in other regions. 31

53.8% of all immigrants in Florida were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2014. 32

In 2012, 1,811,329 people (or 19.9% of all registered voters in Florida) were newly naturalized citizens or U.S. born children of immigrants. 33

In 2014, foreign-born workers totaled 2,422,151 and made-up 23.4% of Florida’s workforce. 34

Between 2009 and 2013, 372,000 undocumented immigrants held permanent jobs in Florida, representing 66% of the undocumented civilian population. 35 In 2008, The Perryman Group found that removing undocumented immigrants from Florida would result in a $43.9billion loss in economic activity and a $19.5 billion loss in gross state product, as well as a loss of 262,436 jobs. 36

Undocumented immigrants in Florida paid $605.0 million in state and local taxes in 2012. 37

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